11.2 C
New York
Saturday, April 17, 2021

A history of Dream, before it opened its doors again

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

It was exactly five years ago that Dream, to be exact, was born. Led by Anne Riggs and Julia Backhaus, Dream Team Projects (as well as James Reaney, in a part-time capacity) was born as a members-only, artist-run space aimed at the makers, bohemians, and seekers of art that often found themselves alienated from galleries and museum spaces.

This space is no longer dedicated to its founders and members, but the Dream Museum remains one of the most unique in New York, with its landmark building on West 17th Street and the extensive collection of works of diverse cultures that lend a distinctive flavor to each piece. But for the sake of funding and development, the museum has been on hiatus. This year, without its founders, it is reopening with a whopping 130-piece offering (dubbed “Overgrown Blooms”), which was curated by Tania De Sola, the director of curatorial programs at The Met.

What was once a cultural labyrinth will now finally have a curated end.

Many of the pieces are by solo artists who have, in the past, shown in prominent spaces like Whitney and Scope, and need to put up with more press than they’re used to. In other cases, like Manhwa’s exhibition, the designers want to conserve the provenance of previously shown works, exposing them to an audience that might not have wanted them in the first place.

There is one reason to re-enter: the masterwork from Daniel Stern, who is directing four new sets at the Met, according to De Sola. She says that “perhaps…it’s because it’s so far out of commission (2 ft. high, space for two people) that it is possibly getting an over-abundance of attention.

“It is fantastic, a surprising, powerful, beautiful piece—both theatrical and impassioned—that had a great reputation as one of the first huge installations in the not-for-profit Museum of Modern Art.”

- Advertisement -

Latest news

Democratic Challengers to GOP Rival on Squaring Off: ‘Adriano Espaillat, Ritchie Torres. Kathleen Rice.’

Adriano Espaillat, left, who lost a Democratic primary for a House seat from New York’s 13th District to Ritchie Torres, and Kathleen Rice, who...
- Advertisement -

Meet the guy poised to become CEO of the Daily News — and it’s not you

Glenn Hubbard, a prominent investment banker who is co-head of American Management Services, has sold his millions to billionaire Michael Ferro to become co-CEO...

Scott DesJarlais and the difference between electing a populist and a weak one

What does the exit polls tell us about Scott DesJarlais’s loss in Tennessee’s 5th District? Nothing about DeSantis’s upset in Florida’s 2nd District, where...

The new opioid epidemic: How the fatal overdose in a suburb got into a townhouse

PHILADELPHIA — A home near a spectacular natural landmark, surrounded by equally spectacular natural surroundings, seemed like a perfect place to be.But inside the...

Related news

Democratic Challengers to GOP Rival on Squaring Off: ‘Adriano Espaillat, Ritchie Torres. Kathleen Rice.’

Adriano Espaillat, left, who lost a Democratic primary for a House seat from New York’s 13th District to Ritchie Torres, and Kathleen Rice, who...

Meet the guy poised to become CEO of the Daily News — and it’s not you

Glenn Hubbard, a prominent investment banker who is co-head of American Management Services, has sold his millions to billionaire Michael Ferro to become co-CEO...

Scott DesJarlais and the difference between electing a populist and a weak one

What does the exit polls tell us about Scott DesJarlais’s loss in Tennessee’s 5th District? Nothing about DeSantis’s upset in Florida’s 2nd District, where...

The new opioid epidemic: How the fatal overdose in a suburb got into a townhouse

PHILADELPHIA — A home near a spectacular natural landmark, surrounded by equally spectacular natural surroundings, seemed like a perfect place to be.But inside the...
- Advertisement -