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Rapid cycling gym braced for fine after developing dangerous levels of sodium

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Peloton, an indoor cycle gym, may soon start warning customers that they might be risking excessive injury by using its bikes. The company, which opened its third New York City location on Thursday, recently received a warning letter from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) after officials found potentially harmful levels of sodium in its pedaled up bicycle.

According to The New York Times, CPSC officials tested the product’s high-grade composite footscrews, which are used to ensure that their gadgets are spun by power not gravity, and discovered that they were released in enough quantities to create dangerous levels of sodium. The CPSC states that adding extra volume on the pedalbox can lead to the insertion of more feet, which can amplify the speed at which riders propel themselves through the machine’s pedals.

The salt water pose an even bigger risk of injury, because it can inflame the rider’s muscles and feet, and can lead to heat stroke, according to the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.

The NYC location’s owner, Jason Steinfeld, told The Times that he will comply with any new regulations the CPSC imposes on his company. He says Peloton was fully cooperating with the CPSC investigation, and, if any future violations have occurred, it’s already stopped using more powerful pedalbox sizes. He also pledged that all customers will be notified by the company if such violations do occur.

After Peloton was alerted to the potential dangers, the CPSC said it would start informing customers that the company could be exposed to such regulations, or the resulting fines. Peloton is looking into the possibility of making refunds to those customers who purchased the machine due to the CPSC’s findings.

Peloton’s latest location, in NoHo, is located at 254 Ludlow Street. The company has also recently opened a location in Colorado, for its sixth USA location.

https://www.nytimes.com/201…

Jesus Jiménez contributed reporting to this story.

Read the full story at The New York Times.

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