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Saturday, April 17, 2021

Scores of Iraqis and Afghans who worked as translators in Afghanistan, Iraq, and elsewhere, told their applications for entry to U.S. have been denied

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Jung Yong, who worked as a translator for American soldiers in Iraq and Afghanistan before getting refugee status, was one of four German citizens who were told Sunday that their applications for admission to the United States had been denied.

Mr. Jung is among the 600 Iraqis and Afghanis who worked as interpreters for the U.S. military who have been asked to leave the United States as part of President Trump’s crackdown on immigrants from war-torn countries. President Obama had done the same for a much smaller number, but Mr. Trump’s demands increased, leading to a more aggressive vetting process for those seeking to enter the United States as refugees.

The United States granted Ms. Jung, 41, a refugee status two years ago and has now refused to provide work authorization.

“My children need a mother,” Ms. Jung told Germany’s ARD channel. “And they need a place to live with their sister.”

Of those 600 translators, ARD reported the migrants would be required to leave within one week. All of them have applied for political asylum in the United States, ARD reported.

A new government report, however, found that several of those refugees likely obtained their protection through the work of human traffickers.

Pneumonia and pneumonia are rare diseases in the region, but could have been contracted from the health care workers who have experienced torture or abuse, according to the Department of Health and Human Services, and the U.S. admitted just 47 refugees who were suspected of being affected.

These would represent a fraction of the 3,785 Iraqis who are employed as health care workers in the United States. The refugee resettlement program awarded them $5 million in temporary protection as the highest-skilled, highest-paying part of the refugee program.

Read the full report.

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