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Monday, April 19, 2021

This California family lives in a danger zone — how they came back from it

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“My heart is in my throat, and we got to move on.”

Angela and Isaac Wolf are among the 31 California households featured in the new series “Family, Interrupted,” which will examine the everyday lives of families who are currently living in danger zones — one day they could be victims, the next victims.

“The phone rings at 9:59 and I hear my daughter screaming, ‘Get me out of here!’ ” said Angela Wolf, who was hit with a break-in at her Anaheim home six months ago. She was surrounded by her teenagers in the laundry room when she heard the thief run through the house and get a key, summoning her husband Isaac and daughter Sarah.

The couple, who never missed a month of work while raising a family, were home at the time, and had just heard their 14-year-old son Brandon say he would call 911. Instead of thinking about the would-be burglar and her son’s warnings, Angela Wolf thought: “My heart is in my throat.”

Through podcasting, filming, and three-way calls, viewers get to know the families. They get to feel what it would be like to have the threat at their door at any moment. They get to feel the pressure of responding — without seconds of hesitation. (The families are understandably tight-lipped in interviews to avoid further attacks.)

The show, which launched on Oct. 9, was created in part by California family crisis charity Emergency Intervention Services. EP speaks with people who want to use their podcast accounts to raise awareness of the issue.

“They can be able to share personal stories through recording and podcasting that people might not have a lot of ways to connect to in their community,” said Brianne Koch, chief development officer at EIS.

The Wolfs have not given up yet. She said she would buy her car out of her savings account if the culprits were caught, if only to let someone know that she will not move out of the neighborhood until justice is served.

“It’s our home, and it’s our investment,” she said. “You just never know.”

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