8.6 C
New York
Sunday, May 9, 2021

Trump’s Iran Opponent Misrepresented My Comments, National Institutes of Health Head Says

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

WASHINGTON — The head of the National Institutes of Health said Tuesday that a political ad that describes the next disease to come under the N.I.H. as coming from Donald Trump’s feud with Iran is “completely out of context” because the president has not yet accepted Iran’s offer to seek a compromise on its nuclear program.

In a speech on National Public Radio, Dr. Francis Collins said the ad, which says the U.S. will now study how a North Korean missile could carry a deadly virus “like Ebola” is “such a gross misrepresentation” of his statement.

“[Iran] has said they would halt their weapons-related activities, including ballistic missile development,” Dr. Collins said in the interview. “They’ve said they’d accept a verifiable regime that would end their uranium enrichment and reprocessing program. And we have said we are willing to talk to them.”

The ad, which was made by pro-Trump super PAC, Keep America Safe, was released last week ahead of Wednesday’s debate between Mr. Trump and Hillary Clinton.

The ad says the N.I.H. would now study how a North Korean missile could carry a deadly virus “like Ebola.”

It cites Dr. Collins saying that a “2015 terror plot against the White House,” would be studied if the Iran nuclear deal “didn’t proceed.” The Iranian deal began in July 2015, and in 2016 the terror plot against the White House was not mentioned by Dr. Collins, who oversaw the creation of a counterproliferation department within the N.I.H.

The advertisement asks: “Has President Trump given national security a higher priority than his presidential campaign?”

Aides to Dr. Collins have disputed that claim, saying that the White House was doing studies of a wide variety of national security issues.

Read the full story on The New York Times.

- Advertisement -

Latest news

It’s not surprising there are drug problems

WALTHAM, Mass. — Endurance of substance abuse is in many ways an attribute of a horse who has won a Triple Crown — like...
- Advertisement -

Vaccinations fell among Europeans from the early 2000s to the present, despite significant gains in recent years

File photo of infants receiving a measles vaccination against measles at a slum near the northern Mexican city of Coatzacoalcos, April 29, 2014. Turkey...

Health officials halt naloxone use due to low demand

U.S. states have turned down hundreds of thousands of doses of a drug used to stop the fatal effects of an opioid overdose because...

‘No question, we can do better’: How to overcome the stigma of experiencing traumatic events

A year ago on this same date, a nation was first rocked by the Department of Justice’s charge that far too many African-Americans —...

Related news

It’s not surprising there are drug problems

WALTHAM, Mass. — Endurance of substance abuse is in many ways an attribute of a horse who has won a Triple Crown — like...

Vaccinations fell among Europeans from the early 2000s to the present, despite significant gains in recent years

File photo of infants receiving a measles vaccination against measles at a slum near the northern Mexican city of Coatzacoalcos, April 29, 2014. Turkey...

Health officials halt naloxone use due to low demand

U.S. states have turned down hundreds of thousands of doses of a drug used to stop the fatal effects of an opioid overdose because...

‘No question, we can do better’: How to overcome the stigma of experiencing traumatic events

A year ago on this same date, a nation was first rocked by the Department of Justice’s charge that far too many African-Americans —...
- Advertisement -