19.3 C
New York
Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Why Richard Avedon Googled His Red Carpet Photos

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

American photographer Richard Avedon, who passed away last week, was famed for his “muscular large-format pictures” and an interior view of the White House that ran in the New York Times Magazine in 1972, Liza Hamilton wrote in a respectful remembrance. The following is her description of how Avedon arrived at that ambitious image:

In the summer of 1970, in the midst of a depressed New York, Avedon responded to the impasse in Saks Fifth Avenue’s bankruptcy proceedings by interviewing Karl Lagerfeld, who was recently named chief designer of the store. Lagerfeld gave him a major new job: to shoot Hollywood stars on the red carpet for the store’s catalog. “I think I’m on the right track,” Avedon told himself. “I can improve on this job.”

But it wasn’t easy. He sent out request forms to the major studios, but they told him they had no money. He had hired the Times to shoot the stores, and he tried to get money from the Columbia Pictures booth at the Stardust showroom in Las Vegas. In New York, the cash registers were slow. And even with all the knowledge he had acquired from Lagerfeld, he had a hard time tracking down fashion models and waitingresses in person. “They were not just in their clubs, they were in their back rooms,” he recalled later. “I’d know there was something happening—it was the kiss of death—if they didn’t come out.”

- Advertisement -

Latest news

Q&A with Coral Davenport, executive editor, The New York Times

Dear Editor,Readers who believe global warming is a real threat to the planet may be convinced that the United States must do more to...
- Advertisement -

PHOTOS: The world reacts to Nadiya Husain’s conviction in Malaysia

Twitter has been awash with reactions from the sports world after the Malaysian jury convicted Swedish celebrity chef Nadiya Husain in a case of...

The FDA has approved the first combination treatment for transplant rejection

Johnson & Johnson has reached an agreement with the European Union regulator over the approval of its drugs Surgical, Share and Esmya to treat...

A year after the bombing, Boston is still struggling to heal

The images of a tiny boy dying alone in the Boston Marathon’s crowded medical tent became a sign of the depth of the terror...

Related news

Q&A with Coral Davenport, executive editor, The New York Times

Dear Editor,Readers who believe global warming is a real threat to the planet may be convinced that the United States must do more to...

PHOTOS: The world reacts to Nadiya Husain’s conviction in Malaysia

Twitter has been awash with reactions from the sports world after the Malaysian jury convicted Swedish celebrity chef Nadiya Husain in a case of...

The FDA has approved the first combination treatment for transplant rejection

Johnson & Johnson has reached an agreement with the European Union regulator over the approval of its drugs Surgical, Share and Esmya to treat...

A year after the bombing, Boston is still struggling to heal

The images of a tiny boy dying alone in the Boston Marathon’s crowded medical tent became a sign of the depth of the terror...
- Advertisement -