19.3 C
New York
Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Why the earliest reports of swine flu deaths in October were so disappointing

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

The first public announcements were made in Dallas, but New York City was the nation’s epicenter. On Oct. 19, an official of the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention asked reporters in Washington to “be alert and prepared” for reports of Americans falling ill. In Boston, Dr. George Amadeo told residents in a public telephone address to be alert to any unusual symptoms — a five-day period that ended with Boston’s deadliest case.

Doctors initially reported no fatalities from the strains of swine flu. Five people died, however, and 641 patients were diagnosed with swine flu in the United States. It was a revelation that came late in the epidemic. At first doctors and federal health officials failed to recognize the severity of this swine flu because it seemed to affect more healthy people than expected. As the flu season began, doctors suspected they were not anticipating the possible consequences of a mild pandemic.

A pestering public health reporter asked whether the CDC was anticipating that a second wave of flu might arrive a few weeks later in January. Dr. Amadeo replied: “Well, I will have an answer for you at the next weekly report.” The report never came. It was in early February, but it had been two months since the CDC, then with the understanding that another round of flu might be on the way, publicly advised against being sick. A second wave that did arrive was an 8-year-old Texas girl. It could be imagined that such a warning by the CDC would not be circulated widely.

- Advertisement -

Latest news

New York City’s tool for vigilante justice

On Tuesday, Anthony Rosario, a 19-year-old from Brooklyn, turned himself in to the NYPD after a video he made of him allegedly stealing a...
- Advertisement -

How Georgia’s electoral laws could hurt Democrats in 2020

“These problems aren’t limited to Georgia.”On Tuesday night, a group of seven Democratic senators ripped at state officials, particularly Georgia’s secretary of state, Kirby...

Q&A with Coral Davenport, executive editor, The New York Times

Dear Editor,Readers who believe global warming is a real threat to the planet may be convinced that the United States must do more to...

PHOTOS: The world reacts to Nadiya Husain’s conviction in Malaysia

Twitter has been awash with reactions from the sports world after the Malaysian jury convicted Swedish celebrity chef Nadiya Husain in a case of...

Related news

New York City’s tool for vigilante justice

On Tuesday, Anthony Rosario, a 19-year-old from Brooklyn, turned himself in to the NYPD after a video he made of him allegedly stealing a...

How Georgia’s electoral laws could hurt Democrats in 2020

“These problems aren’t limited to Georgia.”On Tuesday night, a group of seven Democratic senators ripped at state officials, particularly Georgia’s secretary of state, Kirby...

Q&A with Coral Davenport, executive editor, The New York Times

Dear Editor,Readers who believe global warming is a real threat to the planet may be convinced that the United States must do more to...

PHOTOS: The world reacts to Nadiya Husain’s conviction in Malaysia

Twitter has been awash with reactions from the sports world after the Malaysian jury convicted Swedish celebrity chef Nadiya Husain in a case of...
- Advertisement -